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   Berghaus Yeti Extrem Gaiter


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Yeti gaiters have been around since the eighties and, over time, have evolved to take advantage of lighter and more durable materials. These Yeti Extrem gaiters are suitable for use with the majority of four season boots and do a great job of keeping out water as well as preserving warmth.
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Berghaus Yeti Extrem Gaiter

Official Berghaus Yeti Extrem Gaiter specification from Berghaus

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Berghaus Yeti Extrem Gaiter

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   Berghaus Yeti Extrem Gaiter Reviews

  Reviewed by Ron Keulen (Somewhere) on 2005-09-30:
General comments: I use these Yeti's since they are on the market. Under rough conditions in Norway and Sweden. They perform outstanding, keeping my feet dry. I don't get why not everybody has them.
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  Reviewed by David French (Surrey, UK) on 2006-01-04:
General comments: I'm not the sort of person to enjoy getting wet feet. That's why, about ten years ago, I invested in a set of Yeti gaiters. If you've seen them but not tried them, you might think they seal around the sole of your boot, creating a hi-tech wellie. Well, it's not quite like that - the rubber rand which fits around the boot won't seal it altogether, but it does make it pretty water resistant for most purposes apart from wading. Yetis actually fit a variety of boots, but the rubber strap which fits under the sole is designed for a certain restricted set of soles which aren't generally widely available now. So you have a choice - cut off the rubber strap, or attack your boots with a sharp knife to cut a channel for the rubber. I'd recommend the second approach, ideally, as it keeps the gaiter more secure. The lower part of the gaiter (the rand) is rubber, but the upper part is Gore-Tex of course. So it's breathable, and waterproof, as you'd expect. As already mentioned, these gaiters won't make your feet totally waterproof, but in ten years or so of splashing through bogs, crossing rivers and walking across wet moorland and grassland, I've not yet had wet feet. Standing in a river is not recommended though. Yetis are notoriously hard to get on and off, although it's fine with practice, providing you have the correct size for the boot! Too large and they will ping off the toe all the time; too small and they will do the same, and also rip out your fingernails when you try to put them back on. So make sure you get the right size. Some people glue them on, but I've never really found this works, it just weakens the rubber. Providing you treat them well, the rubber rand actually lasts quite a long time (my current pair have been going at least five years, including plenty of ice and rock use), and Berghaus will re-rand them for you if needed (although by that time you might want to look at a new pair). Yetis can be worn with crampons on certain boots, such as the Scarpa Manta.

Pros: You'll never have to put your feet in wet boots in the morning!

Cons: Wouldn't it be nice if they made them totally seal to the boot?
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  Reviewed by Thomas Williams (Chester) on 2006-01-17:
General comments: In my honest opinion i think this is the best product ever produced by Berghaus. I have had a pair on my winter boots for several years now and i have not yet experinced wet feet. They are fantastic for the boggy wet walkins you often get below the snowline in winter, where you effectively have a pair of wellintons. They also add a little bit of warmth to your boots by putting a membrane between you and the outside. The pair i have are the modern GTX ones however i think i would rather have the harder wearing canvas ones of old but sadly they arn't made any more.

Pros: Dry feet in pretty much all conditions.

Cons: Tricky to get on. The pair i have seem to have poor quality rubber rands which are easily split. The price tag.
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  Reviewed by Mark (Edinburgh) on 2006-01-24:
General comments: An iconic product for Berghaus, these gaiters have been arrange in various incarnations for many years and there are numerous outdoor enthusiasts who swear by them. The unique attraction to them is that they feature a tight rubber rand that is designed to fit really snugly around the circumference of your boot and boost, if not guarantee their waterproofness. Once you have waded a swollen burn in a pair up past your ankles without getting wet feet, you too may be converted. For use in Scotland in our typically stormy and rainy weather they can be a real advantage over the more usual design of gaiter. A pig to fit on to your boots, but once that's done you'll be pleased you did. I might joke but this can be a real struggle as the rand is an extremely tight fit. Persevere though, as the result is worth the effort. One tip is to use a spot of superglue to attach the rand to the toe as it is prone to popping off otherwise, particularly if the gaiters are mated with boots which have a flexible sole.

Pros: Superior weatherproofing - the Range Rover of gaiters.

Cons: A real hassle to fit; rubber rand prone to splitting.
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  Reviewed by Mick Wood (Chesterfield) on 2006-01-24:
General comments: These yeti-gaiters are the daddy of all gaiters! enough said...but then that wouldn't be much of a review if I left it there would it? Essentially what the Yeti Extreme provide is a gore-tex cover to your foot and lower leg which is attached to a rubber rand that connects to the boot. The rubber rand gives an extremely tight fit around the boot and depending upon the boot a certain amount of 'adaptation' may be needed (either to the boot or the gaiter). Other folks may take the gaiter on or off as and when needed however I have mine living on my winter boots (I never take them off!). In fact I have even glued them on! In essence what I have created is a set of boots specifically for use when conditions dictate - a complete foot system if you will. Due to the rubber used there may be a negative side in terms of what glue you use and the life of the rubber - some glues can deteriorate the rubber itself so be careful! What ever method you use for the use of your gaiters you will undoubtably be happy with your choice and will never go back to 'normal gaiters again!

Pros: Great fit, effective barrier to water, dirt etc.

Cons: Not great at swapping from boot to boot - can be difficult to fit 1st time
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  Reviewed by Daniel Winter (Bangor) on 2006-02-28:
General comments: Probly the best pair of gaiters on the market if they fit your boots. Although intended for berghaus boots due to a strip of rubber on the underside it can be removed so to fit other makes of boot better . Ther first thing you notice about the gaiter is it covers the whole boot right down to the sole .and seal it off with a thick rubber rank around the edge of the boot . this keeps all th ewater mud and snow out of your boots so you can avoid the pleasure of walking around the hills with soggy socks . The material is very thick and robust so thorns and crampons should have a hard time penertrating though it . The gaiters come up high on the leg so wading though swallow rivers is possible . And in a light spot of rain you can wear the gaiters without waterproof trousers without getting wet legs . The zips are nice and large so you dont have to struggle with thick gloves on trying to adjust them

Pros: Very waterproof , Robust

Cons: Tricky to get on the boot so better to leave then on all the time. Make sure you can fit your cranpons over the top
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  Reviewed by Ben Orriss (southampton) on 2006-03-06:
General comments: I have used yeti's for 6 years now and found them to be perfect in nearly all conditions. They were first used on Dartmoor and proved idea for the times when rivers needed crossing and deep bogs were an issue. The benifits of a sealed system around the boot rather than just a gaiter proved perfect in preventing water entering the inside of my boots. The system is not as easy to attach to boots as standard gaiters due to the tight rubber rand requiring to be stretched around the sole unit but over time technique enable me to put on the yetis in a similar time to a standard gaiter.The Gore- tex fabric kept my calfs comfortable, unfortunately the lower tougher fabric is not breathable and reduced the ability for the boots to transport mositrue away from the foot. This meant on long hot walks it is advisable to remove yetis as this problem will outweight the benifits. The zips are surprisingly waterproof, with only strong stream currents seeping through. These have also been used in scottish winter conditions and the Alps where the added insulation and snow gaiter effect proved highly useful.

Pros: Unstopable performance over wet ground, or deep snow. Far better than standard gaiters, durable lower fabric combined with breathable upper

Cons: feet become sweaty on hot days. relitively expencive but worth it
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  Reviewed by DREW MORRIS (SUNDERLAND) on 2006-04-07:
General comments: For the past two months, I've worn these gaiters on almost every walk I've taken.during this period has been wet, rainy, cold and occasionally frosty. I've worn the gaiters with two types of footwear. My boots, which are Karrimor KSB, fabric and leather, and GoreTex lined, and my Merrell Chameleon trail-shoes which are also fabric and leather but do not have a waterproof lining. In terms of fit, not unexpectedly, the gaiters work best on my boots. There seems to be just the right amount of material in the lower part of the gaiters that fits over and around the boot, to efficiently cover the important parts of my boot without there being any excess which would 'pouch' and leave gaps in the fitting. The leg portion, when wearing just one pair of stretch trail-pants, is quite snug-fitting. These gaiters are slimmer in the leg than most other similar ones I've tried but not uncomfortably so and, were they any wider in this section, for me, this would be wasted material. The length of the gaiters is spot-on for me, when worn with my boots. They terminate just below the back of my knee, completely covering my calf muscle and when I tighten the top strap, because it's wide and not like a cord, I can hardly feel any pressure from it. This is a very comfortable top fixing in my opinion. I've not noticed any times when the gaiters seem to be sliding down, as most of the time, most lower leg movements seem to be within the scope of the material available (so to speak) and they don't seem to be stretched. I have no problem pulling the front of the gaiters forward to hook it in the bottom lace of my boots and I think that if I had a pair of boots that laced to further down the toe-cap than my current ones, the elastic around the bottom edge, would allow the gaiter to fit these too.

Pros: Putting the gaiters on and taking them off couldn't be easier.

Cons: I was at first irritated by the amount of the top strap that was flapping loose
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  Reviewed by DREW MORRIS (SUNDERLAND) on 2006-04-07:
General comments: For the past two months, I've worn these gaiters on almost every walk I've taken.during this period has been wet, rainy, cold and occasionally frosty. I've worn the gaiters with two types of footwear. My boots, which are Karrimor KSB, fabric and leather, and GoreTex lined, and my Merrell Chameleon trail-shoes which are also fabric and leather but do not have a waterproof lining. In terms of fit, not unexpectedly, the gaiters work best on my boots. There seems to be just the right amount of material in the lower part of the gaiters that fits over and around the boot, to efficiently cover the important parts of my boot without there being any excess which would 'pouch' and leave gaps in the fitting. The leg portion, when wearing just one pair of stretch trail-pants, is quite snug-fitting. These gaiters are slimmer in the leg than most other similar ones I've tried but not uncomfortably so and, were they any wider in this section, for me, this would be wasted material. The length of the gaiters is spot-on for me, when worn with my boots. They terminate just below the back of my knee, completely covering my calf muscle and when I tighten the top strap, because it's wide and not like a cord, I can hardly feel any pressure from it. This is a very comfortable top fixing in my opinion. I've not noticed any times when the gaiters seem to be sliding down, as most of the time, most lower leg movements seem to be within the scope of the material available (so to speak) and they don't seem to be stretched. I have no problem pulling the front of the gaiters forward to hook it in the bottom lace of my boots and I think that if I had a pair of boots that laced to further down the toe-cap than my current ones, the elastic around the bottom edge, would allow the gaiter to fit these too.

Pros: Putting the gaiters on and taking them off couldn't be easier.

Cons: I was at first irritated by the amount of the top strap that was flapping loose.
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  Reviewed by Rich L (Aberdeen) on 2006-04-20:
General comments: My name is Richard and I am Yeti addict! I was given a pair of fetching red and navy yetis by my father which I wore out as a teenager doing the munros, I then joined the army and bought a pair of green Yeti Wilderness gaiters to go on Lowa boots. Having left the army, I bought a pair of Yeti Extreme Gaiters in Jackson Sports in Northern Ireland. They have all been superb, but they do not last as long as their rugged looks would indicate. As an experienced Yeti user I now keep them glued to the front of my boots with Seamgrip, which keeps them locked in position yet is easy to peel off mat the end of the season, I know of climbing mates who also use Ski Skin glue as an alternative, but I am a cheapskate! My current pair are so worn that the pattern on the rand has disappeared and the rand is split in many places. I have 6 patches in the gaiter upper fixed with seamgrip and tent fabric. But…..they still seem waterproof and are standard issue for me when winter climbing. I always have warm feet and they make your boots last much longer…I see no downsides except the cost, after 20 odd years of production, couldn’t the price come down a bit Berghaus? i.e. MAKE THE RE-RANDS CHEAPER and we’ll re-rand them more often!

Pros: waterproof, tough,

Cons: Expensive, re-rands are ridiculously expensive, they don't stay on your boots without glue
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  Reviewed by Ben Adcock (London) on 2006-08-10:
General comments: I bought these gaiters under high recommendation from others. Despite being clearly more expensive than any other gaiters on the market, they are well worth the extra money. I have now used mine for three years of walking in Scotland and I can’t think of a time where my feet have got wet. The gaiters are great for these types of conditions and also very useful for river crossings. Despite being difficult initially to fit onto the boots, the watertight rubber fitting provides almost complete protection from water. The gaiters also help to protect walking boots, in particular crampon mountings, from scree and rock, and importantly, can be worn with crampons. On the downside, the gaiters are not as breathable as I expected. In fact, on some walks I have been reduced to unzipping the leg fastenings to allow some airflow into my boots. But I found this is a small price to pay for such good protection from water. Like other users of these gaiters I found that the small rubber rand broke after a little while. But this hasn’t caused any problems, and the main rubber rand shows no sign of wear. Like most people who have bought these gaiters I found that fitting them onto my boots was a seemingly impossible task. But after an hour or so of struggle I got a snug fitting to compensate for the pain in my fingers. It is important to get the correct size of gaiters; otherwise the toe of the gaiter tends to pop up over the end of the boot at regular intervals.

Pros: Waterproof and hard wearing. Increase the lifespan of your boots, and protect your feet from water.

Cons: Not very breathable. Difficult to fit on initially.
This review has 2 comment(s):

MAGIC TECHNIQUE for fitting Yetis responded : I've just purchased some military-spec Yeti-lookalikes with rubber rands so beefy that they would reduce an 18 stone Para to tears. I'm experienced with civvy yetis but these brutes defeated me for 2 days ... until I had inspiration and came up with this FITTING TECHNIQUE ... that avoids the pain and grief. It works for these monsters, so should be a breeze for regular Yetis. 1. Find a good solidly-planted post about as thick as a leg, stick the boot onto it (upside down of course) and lace it tightly, This not only holds it in place but organises the laces so that they don't get trapped between boot and gaiter. 2. Put toe of boot through the front hole in the gaiter sole and with a good tug seat the heel rubber in place, sort out any trapped fabric. 3. Finally return to the toe of the gaiter, grab the rubber in two hands and pull like blazes. THE GREAT BENEFIT of this approach is that the whole gaiter rubber from heel to toe gets tensioned at once, where using the conventional technique it gets done by halves. 4. Use a BLUNT ROUNDED lever to ease the rand into its final position. GOOD LUCK! (2008-04-20)

Steve Thomson responded : What about putting the rubber rand into hot water to soften it.... Regards, jsthomson (2009-03-07)

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  Reviewed by Micheal (Ireland) on 2009-03-22:
General comments: I agree with most of what has been said above. Only thing I have to add is some unhappiness with the zip. Had my yetis in Norway a while back and - probably due to cold - the zip just disintegrated while I was trying to close it one morning. It looks like a generic brand zip: can they not improve on that sort of thing?

Pros: Bombproof when fixed in place.

Cons: Rand tended to slip up and over the top ( I glued the rand to the boot in the end). Rubber strap not right for my boots (Scarpa Vega). Zip.
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  Reviewed by gaston (argentina) on 2009-11-13:
General comments: I´m planning to get one of these for my Bates Tora Bora boots. Can you still use automatic crampons with these gaiters??
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  Reviewed by kenny (oil rig north sea) on 2010-08-07:
General comments: how to put your yeti gaiters on ..do it the same as you would to replace a tyre on your bike.heel on first ,then use two tyre levers from your bike repair kit run them both up to the toe under the rand then flip it into place.SIMPLE, use of a hair dryer can help.to glue first key up the rubber on the inside of the rand at the toe and on the boot make sure it is clean and use the rubber glue from your bike kit,again do this when you have got the gaiter on and are happy with the fit,use the bike lever to run under the rand from on side of the toe over to the other and as you lift the rand from the boot apply a bead of glue , use a match to spread the glue if you need to .then leave them for a few hours to bond.so the you go ,no more tears or broken finger nails

Pros: great

Cons: none
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